Surreal Landscape Photography

Surreal Landscape Photography

Blog Home / Photography Blog / Create Stunning Surreal Landscape Photography With This Quick Trick Post-processing Landscape Macro Lighting Portraits Wedding Commercial Nature Subscribe & Join Craftsy Learn from the world’s best photography instructors when you join Craftsy now. Plus, enjoy free tutorials, giveaways & much more! Subscribe to the photography blog. Be the first to know about new classes and great supplies! Photography Blog Create Stunning Surreal Landscape Photography With This Quick Trick By Jeff Sinon on April 13, 2015 If you’re interested in creating photos with a surreal look and feel, you’re going to need to brush up on your long exposure techniques. A change in shutter speed can take your photo from dramatic and exciting to surreal and dreamy. Learn how to create surreal landscape photography through long exposure techniques. Go long with your exposure times Both of the following photos showing New Hampshire’s Presidential Range have nearly identical compositions. In fact, they were captured minutes apart. Obviously, they are quite different in both look and feel, eliciting completely different emotions. All that I needed to create the difference between the two photos was a change in shutter speed. The first image was shot with a shutter speed of 1/20th of a second. The second shot had the shutter open for 20 seconds. While the first photo is quite dramatic, the second shows dreamy smooth water and windblown clouds, adding a bit of surrealism and a more peaceful quality. How long is a long exposure? Generally, when I think “long exposure,” I’m thinking 10 seconds or longer. Other than that, there really is no hard and fast rule. Let the dream in your head be the guide for the exposure time. When creating surreal landscapes using long exposures, one thing you need is patience. With the extended exposure times required to render whatever moves with in the photo, long grass, clouds or water, you’re going to need patience. During long exposures, I try to take in as much of the scene as I can, contemplating my next photograph. What to photograph When trying to create a surreal landscape photograph, one of the easiest methods is to have something moving in the scene as you’re taking your pictures. It could be long marsh grass blowing in the wind, clouds streaking through the sky or water. It’s no accident that the majority of the photos in this article are seascapes. Photographing the rolling surf or crashing waves along the seacoast while using a long exposure time is probably the easiest subject for making surreal images. Filters and other miscellaneous tools Remote shutter release For exposure times of 30 seconds or less, you can get away with your camera’s self timer. For anything longer, you’re going to need a remote shutter release. Since you’ll need to be shooting in bulb mode (where the shutter remains open as long as the shutter is pressed), you’ll need a remote release to not cause any camera movement while the shutter is open. It should go without saying that you’ll need a tripod to hold the camera steady during the long exposures. Neutral density filters Neutral density filters are rated by how many stops of light they prevent from making it through the lens to the sensor. By limiting the amount of light, you’re able to increase exposure time. With the filter, you’ll often being able to achieve longer exposures under brighter light. Neutral density filters are available with a fixed ratings, up to 10-stops. Variable neutral density filters, adjustable to reduce from 2-8 stops of light from reaching the sensor, are also available. Whether variable or fixed, the filters can be so dark that you may need to remove them in order to focus and compose the photo. Understand Exposure for Better Photos Fast Learn to manipulate depth of field & shutter speed for your best photos.Get the FREE Guide » 9 Comments Nancy de Flon April 14th, 2015 Jeff, those two versions of the White Mtns scene, that sold me. I have one of those ND filters and have never ever got anything like a usable shot with it. I was almost going to sell it. Maybe you can show me what I’m doing wrong when we meet up. I’ve got some interesting long-exposure shots on the R.I. beaches but late in the day when the filter wasn’t needed. Reply Jeff Sinon April 15th, 2015 Thank you, Nancy. It does take a bit of experimentation to get the most out of ND filters. I’ve found they work well if there’s a lot of movement, i.e. wind blown clouds, waves, etc when you want to get really long exposures. Longer than by just stopping down your lens would normally give you. And yes, we we get together that is one thing we can definitely work on. The fun thing about ND filters is that if your filter is dark enough you can get longer exposures in brighter light than you ever could by simply using a smaller aperture and low ISO. Reply Carolyn April 20th, 2015 Great article! I may try this. Thank you for sharing. Reply Jeff Sinon June 17th, 2015 Thank you! Reply Denis Laverick June 16th, 2015 Denis Laverick Brilliant article Jeff. Like Nancy de Flon, I have ND filters and not sure what to do with them. Your article has shown me the way forward. Keep up the great work. Reply Jeff Sinon June 17th, 2015 Thanks, Denis. I find ND filters fun to play with as there is a bit of experimentation involved and you never really know what you’re going to get until you see it pop up on the LCD. Reply Steve Hepburn July 3rd, 2015 In the second of the comparative images I can’t help but notice a strong violet hue. I can’t see a “neutral” density filter causing this, as it is “neutral”. Was this image also post processed? Reply Jim Hennessey July 13th, 2015 Being very new at long exposure photo’s, if the exposure is that long, how is there not blur? I use much shorter exposures to get running water in a stream to look that nice white foam look, but, still have issues with blur. What is the trick to get no blur after 10 seconds? Reply Jeff Sinon July 13th, 2015 Jim the first thing, if you’re not already is to use a tripod. There is no way to hold a camera steady during longer exposures. Secondly, I recommend a remote shutter release so you’re not touching the camera at all once you’ve set up your composition. Also, turn off image stabilization when using a tripod. Of course if there are plants and trees in the photo and it’s windy out you’re going to get some blur there too which is difficult to avoid. Hope this helps. Reply Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *Comment Name * Email * Website Leave a Reply Related PostsThis Talented Landscape Photographer Shares What’s in His Camera Bag4 Ways to Take Better Waterfall Photos6 Tips & Tricks for Capturing Cityscape Photography
surreal landscape photography 1

Surreal Landscape Photography

Post-processing Landscape Macro Lighting Portraits Wedding Commercial Nature Subscribe & Join Craftsy Learn from the world’s best photography instructors when you join Craftsy now. Plus, enjoy free tutorials, giveaways & much more! Subscribe to the photography blog. Be the first to know about new classes and great supplies! Photography Blog Create Stunning Surreal Landscape Photography With This Quick Trick By Jeff Sinon on April 13, 2015 If you’re interested in creating photos with a surreal look and feel, you’re going to need to brush up on your long exposure techniques. A change in shutter speed can take your photo from dramatic and exciting to surreal and dreamy. Learn how to create surreal landscape photography through long exposure techniques. Go long with your exposure times Both of the following photos showing New Hampshire’s Presidential Range have nearly identical compositions. In fact, they were captured minutes apart. Obviously, they are quite different in both look and feel, eliciting completely different emotions. All that I needed to create the difference between the two photos was a change in shutter speed. The first image was shot with a shutter speed of 1/20th of a second. The second shot had the shutter open for 20 seconds. While the first photo is quite dramatic, the second shows dreamy smooth water and windblown clouds, adding a bit of surrealism and a more peaceful quality. How long is a long exposure? Generally, when I think “long exposure,” I’m thinking 10 seconds or longer. Other than that, there really is no hard and fast rule. Let the dream in your head be the guide for the exposure time. When creating surreal landscapes using long exposures, one thing you need is patience. With the extended exposure times required to render whatever moves with in the photo, long grass, clouds or water, you’re going to need patience. During long exposures, I try to take in as much of the scene as I can, contemplating my next photograph. What to photograph When trying to create a surreal landscape photograph, one of the easiest methods is to have something moving in the scene as you’re taking your pictures. It could be long marsh grass blowing in the wind, clouds streaking through the sky or water. It’s no accident that the majority of the photos in this article are seascapes. Photographing the rolling surf or crashing waves along the seacoast while using a long exposure time is probably the easiest subject for making surreal images. Filters and other miscellaneous tools Remote shutter release For exposure times of 30 seconds or less, you can get away with your camera’s self timer. For anything longer, you’re going to need a remote shutter release. Since you’ll need to be shooting in bulb mode (where the shutter remains open as long as the shutter is pressed), you’ll need a remote release to not cause any camera movement while the shutter is open. It should go without saying that you’ll need a tripod to hold the camera steady during the long exposures. Neutral density filters Neutral density filters are rated by how many stops of light they prevent from making it through the lens to the sensor. By limiting the amount of light, you’re able to increase exposure time. With the filter, you’ll often being able to achieve longer exposures under brighter light. Neutral density filters are available with a fixed ratings, up to 10-stops. Variable neutral density filters, adjustable to reduce from 2-8 stops of light from reaching the sensor, are also available. Whether variable or fixed, the filters can be so dark that you may need to remove them in order to focus and compose the photo. Understand Exposure for Better Photos Fast Learn to manipulate depth of field & shutter speed for your best photos.Get the FREE Guide » 9 Comments Nancy de Flon April 14th, 2015 Jeff, those two versions of the White Mtns scene, that sold me. I have one of those ND filters and have never ever got anything like a usable shot with it. I was almost going to sell it. Maybe you can show me what I’m doing wrong when we meet up. I’ve got some interesting long-exposure shots on the R.I. beaches but late in the day when the filter wasn’t needed. Reply Jeff Sinon April 15th, 2015 Thank you, Nancy. It does take a bit of experimentation to get the most out of ND filters. I’ve found they work well if there’s a lot of movement, i.e. wind blown clouds, waves, etc when you want to get really long exposures. Longer than by just stopping down your lens would normally give you. And yes, we we get together that is one thing we can definitely work on. The fun thing about ND filters is that if your filter is dark enough you can get longer exposures in brighter light than you ever could by simply using a smaller aperture and low ISO. Reply Carolyn April 20th, 2015 Great article! I may try this. Thank you for sharing. Reply Jeff Sinon June 17th, 2015 Thank you! Reply Denis Laverick June 16th, 2015 Denis Laverick Brilliant article Jeff. Like Nancy de Flon, I have ND filters and not sure what to do with them. Your article has shown me the way forward. Keep up the great work. Reply Jeff Sinon June 17th, 2015 Thanks, Denis. I find ND filters fun to play with as there is a bit of experimentation involved and you never really know what you’re going to get until you see it pop up on the LCD. Reply Steve Hepburn July 3rd, 2015 In the second of the comparative images I can’t help but notice a strong violet hue. I can’t see a “neutral” density filter causing this, as it is “neutral”. Was this image also post processed? Reply Jim Hennessey July 13th, 2015 Being very new at long exposure photo’s, if the exposure is that long, how is there not blur? I use much shorter exposures to get running water in a stream to look that nice white foam look, but, still have issues with blur. What is the trick to get no blur after 10 seconds? Reply Jeff Sinon July 13th, 2015 Jim the first thing, if you’re not already is to use a tripod. There is no way to hold a camera steady during longer exposures. Secondly, I recommend a remote shutter release so you’re not touching the camera at all once you’ve set up your composition. Also, turn off image stabilization when using a tripod. Of course if there are plants and trees in the photo and it’s windy out you’re going to get some blur there too which is difficult to avoid. Hope this helps. Reply Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *Comment Name * Email * Website Leave a Reply Related PostsThis Talented Landscape Photographer Shares What’s in His Camera Bag4 Ways to Take Better Waterfall Photos6 Tips & Tricks for Capturing Cityscape Photography

Surreal Landscape Photography