New Mexico Landscape Photography

New Mexico Landscape Photography

Here are some high resolution panoramic photographs of the Albuquerque, New Mexico area made by joining together large numbers of individual photographs. These pictures feature the Sandia Mountains and the Rio Grande River. These images are available for purchase as prints or in frames. The large text on some of these web reductions is for copyright purposes only and does not appear on prints. For more information please call 505-803-4180, or send an email. Please also visit Sylvia Ortiz Domney’s site Three views of the Albuquerque, New Mexico’s Sandia Mountains from about the same location. The snow scenes capture the last sunset of the 2006 on New Year’s Eve. The summer view was photographed on August 30, 2005. Each image is composed of about 12 individual photographs. An irrigation canal in Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, July, 2007. 16.3″ x 44″ and larger . Late October, 2007. 16.3″ x 44″ and larger. Late October, 2007. The tree row at the entrance to Los Poblanos Inn, just a few minutes from downtown Albuquerque. 12.5″ x 24″ and larger. Late October, 2007 in Los Ranchos de Albuquerque. 18″ x 43″ and larger. Albuquerque’s Sandia Mountains before an August thunderstorm. Very high resolution, various sizes and cropping from 16″ x 44″ to 22″ x 55″ On the road to Placitas, New Mexico, September 13, 2006. This photograph is a composite of 36 Individual, high resolution images. 22″ x 55″ An irrigation canal brings Rio Grande water to farms and ranches in Corrales, New Mexico, to the northwest of Albuquerque. 20″ x 44″. Late afternoon sunlight in communities along the Rio Grande. A Corrales road at left, and an irrigation canal in Los Ranchos de Albuquerque. A Corrales, New Mexico pasture on a July afternoon. 16.3″ x 42″ and larger A rain swollen Rio Grande reflects the evening sky. 15″ x 35″ That centerpiece of American Southwest folklore, El Rio Grande as it winds through Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Sandia Mountains are to the right. A thunderstorm was directly overhead when I took this sunset photograph. The Cottonwoods are starting their yearly change in late October. The Rio Grande rises and falls with the seasons, during the summer monsoons the sand bars are completely covered with water. A composite of about 12 images. 12″ x 44″ and larger. Extinct volcanoes west of Albuquerque, New Mexico on October 28, 2006. 20″ x 55″ A city park in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The downtown city lights of Albuquerque, New Mexico on a summer’s evening. 17.7″ x 36.5″ Waiting for Amtrak’s Southwest Chief on a dazzling summer afternoon at the corner of Route 66 and the Santa Fe main line. The recreated shapes of the old Alvarado Hotel once again grace Albuquerque, New Mexico’s skyline. I stood in the footprints of countless historical photographers and postcard makers while recording this image, this is my contribution to an old tradition. 15″ x 55″ A picture of the Sandia Mountains in their classic late-afternoon “Watermelon” aspect. Sandia means Watermelon in Spanish. These west facing mountains reflect the sunset colors across the city of Albuquerque, and are its defining landmark. You can see the dry season foliage adaptations in the foreground. In contrast, the top of this mountain receives more than 60 inches of rain each year and has a Hudsonian climatic zone with Douglas fir, Spruce, Aspen, and lush ferns. This is a composite of 57, 4288 x 2880 pixel images arranged in 3 rows of 19 picture each. Total resolution is 10600 pixels by about 36000 pixels, or roughly 380 megapixels! Normal print size is 17.1″ x 56″, prints up to 30″ x 100″ still show the finest details on closest inspection. A dusting of snow on the Sandia Mountains on November 30, 2006, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 20″ x 55″ Like its predecessors over many decades, Amtrak’s Southwest Chief pauses in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 17.8″ x 54″ The Occidental Life Building just south of Route 66 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A harvest Moon rises of the Village of Corrales, New Mexico on November 5, 2006. The distant Albuquerque skyline is visible at extreme right. This hyper-detailed image prints 21″ x 106″ at 360 original camera pixels per inch, and can be examined with a magnifier even at that scale. Houses 9 miles away on the base of the mountains are clearly defined. Reductions to 11.5″ x 56″ and smaller are also available. A flood control dam moderates the runoff from brief but intense monsoon season rains.

New Mexico Landscape Photography

Brennan Studio is a fine art and commercial photography studio located in Taos, New Mexico. Kathleen Brennan’s New Mexico landscape photographs have won numerous awards and are in private and museum collections. As a multidiscinplinary artist with a strong emphasis on photographic techniques, Kathleen’s work has been called poetic and masterful. Most images are available as prints on archival paper or canvas. Brennan’s commercial work includes product and catalog photography for print and web, art reproduction for artist portfolios and website, and portraits of individuals and small groups. She also does assignment work for publication. Stock images are available for licensing through this website and at Getty Images. //

New Mexico Landscape Photography

Brennan Studio is a fine art and commercial photography studio located in Taos, New Mexico. Kathleen Brennan’s New Mexico landscape photographs have won numerous awards and are in private and museum collections. As a multidiscinplinary artist with a strong emphasis on photographic techniques, Kathleen’s work has been called poetic and masterful. Most images are available as prints on archival paper or canvas.

New Mexico Landscape Photography

New Mexico is a great location for getting amazing photos of the beautiful southwestern landscape. There are plenty of noteworthy destinations for photography, and several of them are not all that well known, so it presents the opportunity to get unique photos. This page showcases many of the most noteworthy locations in the state for landscape photographers with the hope of helping you plan your own outings. The interactive map below shows the location of each spot mentioned on this page. Please be aware that locations may look close to each other on the map, but roads are very limited in many parts of the state, so it can still take quite a while to drive from one location to another. Choose the locations that you want to visit and research to learn about the best way to get from point A to point B.

New Mexico Landscape Photography

El Morro National Monument is located in western New Mexico, west of El Malpais National Monument. Here you’ll find a large sandstone bluff with a waterhole at the base. There are trails available, but the main attraction (from a landscape photography purpose) is the sandstone bluff itself.

New Mexico Landscape Photography

Acoma Pueblo is located in western New Mexico, just east of El Malpais National Monument. The Acoma people have occupied this area for more than 800 years on top of a large mesa. Today there are about 300 structures on top of the mesa with a small number permanent residents. Others live in the surrounding area. As far as photography is concerned, the structures themselves make for interesting subjects, and the mesa and surrounding landscape presents great opportunities as well.

New Mexico Landscape Photography

All over New Mexico when it rains this state is the only one that really smells fresh and this is due to the bush that grown here in New Mexico, Texas and Arizona and Colorado do not have this bush, I have one growing in my yard and when I spray this bush it gives out this fresh smell and it is heavenly to smell. Love this land.
New Mexico Landscape Photography

New Mexico Landscape Photography

Reply Cindy December 8, 2014 no she is not being dirty. I believe she is talking of the sage that grows everywhere here. Thee are twe kinds not remembering the second but it is sage, of course having cleaner air helps. But after it rains it smells so nice outside and she is correct you don’t smell that in the where else. because I have lived in Texas and California. Most my life I have lived in New Mexico I live in New Mexico now.

Hi George, I am actually thinking of relocating to rural N. New Mexico. I’ve never lived there before and will be coming from Northeast, CT. Please do elaborate as to the goings on in rural N. mexico if you wouldn’t mind.
New Mexico Landscape Photography

Reply Youssef houssein April 28, 2014 Es una hermosas fotos de este paraje del desierto de Nuevo México .lo agradezco It is a beautiful picture of this area of ​​New Mexico desert, the agradesco.

City of Rocks State Park is located in southwestern New Mexico and is home to some awesome volcanic rock formations. The formations are as large as 40 feet high, and they are great for getting unique and interesting photos. The park includes trails for exploring the area, and it is known for its dark night sky that is great for night photography.

El Malpais National Monument is located in western New Mexico (Malpais needs “badlands”).  This volcanic landscape provides plenty of opportunities for amazing photos. There are hiking trails that are perfect for exploring, and lave tube caves that are accessible with a permit. The monument features sandstone bluffs, grasslands, and forest.

Ghost Ranch is located in north central New Mexico. It is used as an education and retreat center by the Presbyterian Church, but is accessible to the public. The area has a beautiful landscape that includes red rocks, and there are 5 hiking trails at Ghost Ranch that can be used to get some amazing views. There is a small fee, currently $5, that allows guest access to the trails. Ghost Ranch was the subject of many well-known paintings by Georgia O’Keefe and many movies have been filmed here.