Nebraska Landscape Photography

Nebraska Landscape Photography

By Nicole Crowder By Nicole Crowder December 1, 2014 Follow @nicolemcrowder A tractor sits on a sunny day outside Oneill, NE. (Bill Frakes) After 30 years of working as an award-winning photographer for Sports Illustrated, Bill Frakes traded basketball courts and football fields for the open ranges and expansive landscape of his native Nebraska. Frakes began sharing photographs of sunbursts cutting through bright blue skies and mighty clouds rolling over red clay rocks via Facebook, and today–along with partner Laura Heald– launches a year’s worth of photographs he has amassed on a Web site called The Nebraska Project. In the excerpt below, Frakes describes for In Sight his work and his lasting love for Nebraska’s natural beauty. I’ve had the best seat in the house the past 30 years working as a photographer for Sports Illustrated where I am on staff. Being a staff photographer there is fabulous. I was in and out covering sport as news. With a few exceptions it’s quick hits: in for a competition or short feature story and right back out and on to the next thing. As it should be. This collection of stories–of images–is different. This is home. I’ve photographed here my entire adult life, but not consistently and never with a specific goal other than to just capture moments I enjoyed. With the 150th anniversary of Nebraska’s statehood rapidly approaching I’ve been wanting to do more, to explore deeper, to explain this place I love to anyone willing to spend some time with my photographs and videos. To do that, I’ve spent much of the last year gathering material, which you can start to see the start of here. Nebraska. It’s one of my homes. My first, and most likely my last. That big sky. The rugged beauty of the badlands. The fertile topography of the corn belt. The wonder that is the Platte River, water that feeds the corn and wheat fields, and is home to the Crane Migration. It’s the middle of nowhere, and the center of everywhere.  I’ve been to 138 countries and every U.S. state. Nebraska is the gold standard. There is no better place to make photographs. The light. The diverse topography. The open, friendly people. This place is stunningly beautiful, and powerfully raw. From the plains to the badlands the landscape is varied and rich. The word sublime was invented to define The Sandhills. Underneath it all runs the vast Ogallalla Aquifer which provides water for 20 percent of the corn, wheat and cattle produced in the United States. This is the place my thoughts turn when I need comfort, or inspiration. I love showing it off. The slow broad smiles that creep across the faces of my friends when I bring them here. It’s magic. Clouds pass over Lake Watt on a calm Nebraska day. Mullen, NE (Bill Frakes) The badlands under a cloudy sky in Toadstool Geologic Park outside Crawford, NE. (Bill Frakes) Sunset over the Ponca Cemetery. Niobrara, NE. (Bill Frakes) Chimney Rock. (Bill Frakes) After a snow storm outside Oneill, NE. (Bill Frakes) The badlands in the Oglala National Grasslands outside Crawford, NE. (Bill Frakes) The night sky in Toadstool Geologic Park outside Crawford, NE. (Bill Frakes) A thunderstorm passes quickly through Lakeside, NE. (Bill Frakes) The night sky in Oneill, NE. (Bill Frakes) Cranes fly over Alda, NE. Sandhill cranes migrate annually through Nebraska, resting on their journey north in the calm Platte River. (Bill Frakes) Fog fills a valley at sunrise in Rose, NE. (Bill Frakes) Sunset after a thunderstorm in Sioux County. (Bill Frakes) Electrical Storm passes over Liberty Cove outside Hastings, NE. (Bill Frakes) Sunset afterglow in Toadstool Geologic Park outside Crawford, NE. (Bill Frakes) Standing Bear Bridge, where the Niobrara and Missouri Rivers meet. (Bill Frakes)
nebraska landscape photography 1

Nebraska Landscape Photography

After 30 years of working as an award-winning photographer for Sports Illustrated, Bill Frakes traded basketball courts and football fields for the open ranges and expansive landscape of his native Nebraska. Frakes began sharing photographs of sunbursts cutting through bright blue skies and mighty clouds rolling over red clay rocks via Facebook, and today–along with partner Laura Heald– launches a year’s worth of photographs he has amassed on a Web site called The Nebraska Project. In the excerpt below, Frakes describes for In Sight his work and his lasting love for Nebraska’s natural beauty.
nebraska landscape photography 2

Nebraska Landscape Photography

I’ve been to 138 countries and every U.S. state. Nebraska is the gold standard. There is no better place to make photographs. The light. The diverse topography. The open, friendly people. This place is stunningly beautiful, and powerfully raw. From the plains to the badlands the landscape is varied and rich. The word sublime was invented to define The Sandhills. Underneath it all runs the vast Ogallalla Aquifer which provides water for 20 percent of the corn, wheat and cattle produced in the United States.
nebraska landscape photography 3

Nebraska Landscape Photography

It has been said that the best art is created from pain. I never followed that path. My art comes from things I seek. When I first started this journey, photography provided a path to escape a stressful, energy-draining job and stay creative. While on this chosen path, I learned much about myself, ultimately transforming my life forever. Although time continues to go by, the feeling has never changed. Photography is my safe spot, and the place where I feel most at home. To buy ocean art please click here
nebraska landscape photography 4

Nebraska Landscape Photography

Scott Papek releases: Seabed La Jolla Shoreline, San Diego, California It has been said that the best art is created from pain. I never followed that path. My art comes from things I seek. When I first started this journey, photography provided a path to escape a stressful, energy-draining job and stay creative. While on this chosen path, I learned much about myself, ultimately transforming my life forever. Although time continues to go by, the feeling has never changed. Photography is my safe spot, and the place where I feel most at home. To buy ocean art please click here
nebraska landscape photography 5

Nebraska Landscape Photography

With the 150th anniversary of Nebraska’s statehood rapidly approaching I’ve been wanting to do more, to explore deeper, to explain this place I love to anyone willing to spend some time with my photographs and videos. To do that, I’ve spent much of the last year gathering material, which you can start to see the start of here.
nebraska landscape photography 6

Nebraska Landscape Photography

Nebraska. It’s one of my homes. My first, and most likely my last. That big sky. The rugged beauty of the badlands. The fertile topography of the corn belt. The wonder that is the Platte River, water that feeds the corn and wheat fields, and is home to the Crane Migration. It’s the middle of nowhere, and the center of everywhere. 
nebraska landscape photography 7

Nebraska Landscape Photography

The Rainwater Basin is a region of wetlands in south central Nebraska, south of the Platte River. During spring and fall millions of migratory birds come through the area. the Rainwater Basin is in parts of 21 different counties, with the Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District managing 61 different locations.
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The Lewis and Clark State Recreation Area is in northern Nebraska along the Missouri River. This area offers recreation on the water, as well as scenic overlooks. It is also popular for bird watching, especially bald eagles.
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So where does that leave us? Well to be honest somewhere in the middle. The fact is that there is as much variety in black and white photography as in any other art form. Think of it this way, if we asked everyone to dress in the same way the look would suit a few but be terrible for most. However, there are some simple rules and techniques you should keep in mind when framing black and white photographs.
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“Zen Movement” Click here for pricing and sizing. Black and white photographs have remained popular since their inception roughly 150 years ago. The ability of black and white images to fit many decorating styles has contributed to their increased popularity. As such, people have become more open to alternative, more sophisticated framing designs for these items. How to best frame a black and white photograph is a subject for much conjecture. Plain and simple to take nothing from the art, or more ornate to complement the subject matter? Add colour in the frame design to help draw the eye to the picture, or stick with a rigid two-tone approach to ensure dramatic elegance? So where does that leave us? Well to be honest somewhere in the middle. The fact is that there is as much variety in black and white photography as in any other art form. Think of it this way, if we asked everyone to dress in the same way the look would suit a few but be terrible for most. However, there are some simple rules and techniques you should keep in mind when framing black and white photographs. – Some framers believe a pristine white mount is best for all black and white images, on the basis that it does not detract from the picture itself. However, for pictures with a white focal point, a pristine white mount can be too bright and will compete with the image for attention. – Another common mistake is to try to ‘lighten’ dark art by surrounding it with a light mount. In reality, a light mount border causes the dark colours in the photo to look even darker. – Mounts should be black, white or grey. Any other colour adds an element that isn’t present in the picture. If you have a customer who insists on a colourful mount, a common suggestion is to go for a white mat with a small accent of colour as a second mount. However, this accent actually pulls the eye away from the photo. A better solution is to use the colour as the predominant top mount and place the accent of black or grey below it to work as a transition into the photo. With all that colour surrounding the photo it isolates the image, in affect, drawing attention to it. – When it comes to the moulding, consider the era, style and location of the photograph. As in framing any art piece, each frame must enhance the style and mood of the photograph itself. Many framers believe you should stick to a narrow, basic frame for black and white photographs, but this may not co-ordinate with the subject of the photo. For example, a picture of an ornate piece of architecture may look better with a more classical moulding design. – Elongation is often a good treatment for portrait photographs, images with vertical subjects or strong vertical lines. By making the top and bottom borders wider, it dramatises all those vertical elements. – A mountslip which matches the moulding can create a strong, classic outline around the photograph. This helps pull the viewer’s attention in from the frame to focus on the picture. Mountslips can also help enhance the customised appearance of the design, adding character and perceived value. When any item is framed properly the frame design should add a sense of value to the finished product. So a good frame design will help a mediocre shot look good and an unimaginative framing job will bring even the best picture to the level of a cheap poster. Remember, just because the subject lacks colour doesn’t mean the framing should lack imagination. For more help or to discuss any of the points raised above please do not hesitate to contact us or visit us in person. Source by Mark William Johnson