Macro Nature Photography

Macro Nature Photography

Shikhei Goh is an award winning photographer who is passionate about photography and this is why he tried capturing photographs of different things in this world but macro photography was the most exciting for him. For this reason, Shikhei Goh specializes in capturing macro photographs and aims to create stunning and great macro photos that show the beauty of this amazing world. Shikhei Goh has achieved these amazing results after several trials, criticisms and explorations. He believes that there are always new secrets in the world of macro photography and this is why he keeps exploring to reveal them.
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Macro Nature Photography

Vyacheslav Mishchenko is fond of nature and photography which is responsible for making him a creative and professional macro photographer. He started capturing his first macro photographs when he was just 10 years old. After spending most of his time on painting, he decided to return to photography to specialize in capturing macro photographs. He photographs all insects but focuses more on snails for their beauty, extraordinary shape and catchy behavior. All the insects are photographed in their natural habitat to capture their natural behavior and make the photographs more amazing.
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Macro Nature Photography

In the days of film, macro nature photography was an expensive proposition, requiring expensive special lenses, extension tubes, micro bellows that further separated the lens from the main body of the camera–maybe even a reversing ring that let you put a lens on backwards and use it as a microscope instead of a telescope. But today, most digital cameras come with a macro mode setting. Just twist the dial, and you’re focusing into the Lilliputian world of ladybugs and dandelion seeds. Still, when you turn over to macro mode, you’re giving up control of aperture (how much light is allowed in from the lens) and shutter speed, which some photographers are loathe to do. They prefer the surety of manual settings and single lens reflex (SLR) cameras.
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Macro Nature Photography

Neloy Sinha I take macro photos very often for my clinical materials in Dermatology with my FinePix S9600. But I do not have a ring flash. So it is difficult to go very close to the subject. The Super macro mode helps to take photos without flash. But again flash light, however controlled, sometimes burn the macro detail. So diffuse light is the better option. Being a camera of another era (in terms of digital photography) it is almost unuseable to capture detail beyond 400ISO.But the camera is giving me satisfactory result, if not the best. I am eager to learn more to improve my learning curve through your forecoming series of articles.Like1Sep 7, 2011permalink
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Macro Nature Photography

Neloy Sinha I take macro photos very often for my clinical materials in Dermatology with my FinePix S9600. But I do not have a ring flash. So it is difficult to go very close to the subject. The Super macro mode helps to take photos without flash. But again flash light, however controlled, sometimes burn the macro detail. So diffuse light is the better option. Being a camera of another era (in terms of digital photography) it is almost unuseable to capture detail beyond 400ISO.But the camera is giving me satisfactory result, if not the best. I am eager to learn more to improve my learning curve through your forecoming series of articles.
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Macro Nature Photography

I take macro photos very often for my clinical materials in Dermatology with my FinePix S9600. But I do not have a ring flash. So it is difficult to go very close to the subject. The Super macro mode helps to take photos without flash. But again flash light, however controlled, sometimes burn the macro detail. So diffuse light is the better option. Being a camera of another era (in terms of digital photography) it is almost unuseable to capture detail beyond 400ISO.But the camera is giving me satisfactory result, if not the best. I am eager to learn more to improve my learning curve through your forecoming series of articles.
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Alberto Ghizzi Panizza is an Italian photographer who started to be interested in photography in 1997 after his visit to the ruins of ancient Egypt. His passion for travelling, adventure, nature, insects and animals has helped him to capture creative photographs. He specializes in capturing nature, landscape and macro photographs. He focuses in his photos on showing the beauty of the surrounding world and the wonders that can be found on our planet. His creative work has been published in several photographic magazines, newspapers and websites to quickly spread among those who are interested in macro photography.
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Whenever I teach macro photography I begin with a statement and two questions. The statement is that I, as a nature photographer, teach macro photography in the wild. The two immediate questions that stem from this statement are:

Erez Marom Hey Mike, sorry for the late reply!May favorite location for macro is the Ben-Shemen forest area. It's just packed with insects, I you could spend a lifetime shooting there. But you can find good macro subjects just about anywhere where there's water andqor vegetation.Let me contact you privately about the workshops.Best,ErezLike0Sep 11, 2011permalink
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Erez Marom Hey Mike, sorry for the late reply!May favorite location for macro is the Ben-Shemen forest area. It's just packed with insects, I you could spend a lifetime shooting there. But you can find good macro subjects just about anywhere where there's water andqor vegetation.Let me contact you privately about the workshops.Best,Erez
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Hey Mike, sorry for the late reply!May favorite location for macro is the Ben-Shemen forest area. It's just packed with insects, I you could spend a lifetime shooting there. But you can find good macro subjects just about anywhere where there's water andqor vegetation.Let me contact you privately about the workshops.Best,Erez
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In this article, we’ll look at the different schools of thought on macro nature photography. Whether you are satisfied with the ease of automatic settings or want to keep the control to yourself, keep reading to find out ways to get the shots that will satisfy you and possibly amaze your friends.
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I love macro photography for many of the same reasons you stated. I live in what easily could be called a nature preserve. I love walking through the place with my camera (not a very good one) and trying to slowly get close to the insects, birds and whatever else I can creep up on. I'd like to get a better camera but I don't think that my old Konica/Minolta point& shoot is the weakest link. That would be my lack of knowledge and experience. Thanks for your article, that should help me a good deal.
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The third reason why I shoot in the wild is that I don’t feel that I have a choice. Ultimately, in my opinion, nature and wildlife photographers need to shoot in the wild. Nature photography is all about showing the beauty of the world surrounding us, its intricacy and diversity. And that just cannot be done in a studio, high-tech as it may be. Personally, I believe wildlife photography should be done in nature, nowhere else.
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Carlo Galliani is an Italian photographer who specializes in capturing nature, landscape, macro and wildlife photographs. He focuses on capturing photographs of every aspect of nature without ignoring anything. He pays attention to everything beautiful in this world starting from those small insects that are difficult to be seen to the huge mountains with their stunning beauty trying to show the magnificence of the world in which we live.
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As for the second question – why shoot in the wild? – there are three answers, but they are personal, rather than technical. Firstly, in my opinion, shooting insects and tiny animals is the most fascinating, exciting, forget-all-your-troubles experience a photographer can have. These minute creatures are not only crucial for our existence here on earth, but their colors, structure, behavior and interaction with the living world are unparalleled. Shooting earrings or sushi is considered macro photography, and a lot of photographers make a good living doing it, but does that even begin to compare to shooting a hovering dragonfly or a spider in the midst of a vicious hunt? I seriously doubt it.
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Some fabulous shots here, but I would question how No 9 Krasimir Matarov-Bulgaria made it into the top 10. I don’t even class myself as a decent amatuer, but I’ve got better macro shots than those.
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Len April 23, 2016 at 10:25 amSome fabulous shots here, but I would question how No 9 Krasimir Matarov-Bulgaria made it into the top 10. I don’t even class myself as a decent amatuer, but I’ve got better macro shots than those.
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spencerberus Awesome, I think I replied to another of your articles asking about how you handle the animals, I found most of the answer here, nice to see they aren't in any way harmed, and yet good macro photos are still a possibility in many cases. I shoot a lot of bees – I think they're fascinating, plus they aren't hard to find – but they move a lot. I find I can get the best images when they're busy doing something – generally when they've found a good deal of pollen on a flower. Are your subjects mostly slow moving or otherwise occupied, or do you have some technique for dealing with 'active' subjects?Like1Feb 17, 2012permalinkErez Marom Hi Spencer, sorry for the late reply.I'll elaborate on all my techniques for dealing with insects in a future article.Best regards,ErezLike0Mar 7, 2012permalink