Good Cameras For Nature Photography

Good Cameras For Nature Photography

Nature photography encompasses a wide range of subject matter, from landscape vistas to birds in flight. Naturally, some cameras are better for some types of photography than others. For example, most would prefer a pro DSLR over a “flat”-style mirrorless camera for birds in flight. But today’s DSLRs and mirrorless cameras are quite good across the board, and you don’t have to spend a fortune to get a highly capable nature photography camera. In this article, we’ve selected the best cameras under $1,000 with interchangeable-lens models from the major manufacturers.
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Good Cameras For Nature Photography

Aside from view cameras, the other arena where film can likely still outshine digital in a number of ways is with panoramic cameras. Landscapes are the traditionally fitting subject for panoramic shooters, and panoramic cameras frequently prove to be the most intuitive and well-designed tools for the job, especially due to their bias for wide-angle focal lengths and relatively compact profiles in comparison to view cameras. Currently there are two remaining contenders in the realm of panoramic cameras, both of which produce 6 x 12 and 6 x 17 models.
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Good Cameras For Nature Photography

Full Frame or APS? Telephoto reach is the most important requirement for wildlife photography, bringing you close to subjects without disturbing them. While full-frame cameras are in some respects superior to APS-C models, for wildlife photography, the magnification factor of a smaller sensor enhances telephoto reach. For example, comparing a 20-megapixel full-frame camera with a 20-megapixel APS-C camera, the APS-C model will give you approximately 1.5x magnification of your lens’ focal length, making a 400mm lens equivalent to a 600mm lens. Keep in mind that this is only true if you’re comparing two cameras with the same resolution, as a full-frame image from a higher-resolution camera can be cropped for a similar result. Learn more about working with extreme telephoto lenses for wildlife photography.
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Good Cameras For Nature Photography

Buying a camera for landscape photography can be overwhelming, but the process should be fun and not just a leap of faith. First, choose among the three main tiers of cameras: point-and-shoots, mirrorless cameras, and digital SLRs. Then do some research based on your price range and specifications. The good news is that you can find reasonably priced cameras in all categories that capture quality images, and many are light enough that they won’t be much of a burden to carry. Below is what you need to know, and all of the information is current for 2016.
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Good Cameras For Nature Photography

Completing our brief look at view camera options is a pair of wooden field cameras, which embody the true stereotypical image of large format landscape photography. The Wista Field-45DX is certainly one of the most handsome cameras in this list, which is not to say it isn’t also a quite capable camera for shooting. Full front and rear camera movements are available, along with a 12″ bellows draw to support working with a wide range of focal lengths. This model is the lightest among view cameras, at just 3.25 lb, and folds down into a 7.3 x 8.3 x 3.8″ package. Similar but larger, the Field-810DX takes the same outward appearance and feature set, but maximizes it for 8 x 10″ shooting. A bellows draw up to 21.7″ is possible due to a double-extension bed and both front and rear tilt and swing movements are possible, along with front rise and fall.
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Good Cameras For Nature Photography

There are only a handful of full-frame camera models to choose from, but a new release stands out from the pack: the Canon EOS 5DS R. With a whopping 50.6 megapixels of resolution, the 5DS R offers a whopping 20.1 more megapixels than the Canon 5D Mark IV and a healthy 14.3 more than the Nikon D810. This camera is built for still photography with fewer video options than the competition, but we appreciate the split from the hybrid model at this end of the spectrum. The cameras above not named the Canon EOS 5DS R certainly aren’t slouches, and you can even explore some budget full-frame options like the Canon EOS 6D and Nikon D750. All offer impressive resolutions for landscape photography and are among the best cameras out there.
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Good Cameras For Nature Photography

As cameras continue to evolve and impress, their newest features often play to the fast-paced multimedia world. For landscape photographers, the ability to minimize or eliminate the time it takes to print an image or display it online can have limited use, and tends to overshadow a range of core camera functions that appeal to our genre of photography. Landscape photography can arguably be one of the slowest-paced schools of image-making. As such, it does not have the same subset of requirements as many other categories of photography. Ranging from the most basic features to some of the most advanced technologies, this article strives to highlight a range of specs to look for when shopping for a new camera with the intention of making landscape photographs.
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Good Cameras For Nature Photography

When looking for a camera suitable for landscape photography, a number of factors come into play that might not be considered when browsing cameras for other applications. Speed is not nearly as important a feature as image quality, for instance, and exposure control is paramount among most other concerns. High-resolution sensors tend to be most highly favored due to the immense detail they can garner, as well as the larger print sizes made possible by the files they produce. Unlike sports, wildlife, or street photography, landscape shooting tends to be slow and methodical; lower ISOs, slower shutter speeds, smaller apertures, and working from a tripod are essentially obligatory, whereas with other genres of photography, high ISO sensitivities, fast continuous shooting rates, and quick autofocus systems tend to be the most prized elements of a camera system. This isn’t to say that those features should be overlooked—they are often welcomed—but they are not nearly as crucial to landscape work as they are to faster-paced shooting applications. Fewer frames will also be recorded during a day of shooting in the wilds of Yosemite versus shooting the Formula 1 Grand Prix du Montreal, so file size, buffer capacity, and card speeds do not stand as much of a limitation for the work you can do.
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Nature photography is a broad category that can range from landscapes to seascapes, or from wildlife to flowers and bugs. With such a broad range of subjects, the required camera equipment is equally broad. Your exact setup will depend on your style of photography, as well as the type of nature photography you intend to pursue.
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Point-and-shoot cameras are about the size of a notecard with an attached zoom lens and mostly automatic features (hence the name). Don’t be fooled: technology keeps advancing and these cameras capture great images, are easy to use, lightweight, and relatively cheap. They also run the gamut from cheap models that barely outperform some smartphones to compact cameras built for professionals with large sensors and impressive lenses.
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1 year agoWinston Shaw  I would agree with most of the advice given in this article, with the exception of the comments on lightmeters. In my experience lightmeters have never been less important than they are today. In the days of film a lightmeter was the only tool available that would allow you to make an educated guess as to proper exposure. With the advent of the histogram light meters are a far less essential tool, especially when shooting static subjects like landscapes. Today rather than having to take a variety of exposure readings and then make a compromise exposure most likely to render the most important details correctly I simply shoot 1 or 2 test exposures and then take a look at the histogram. Most times I am then able to achieve the results I want by setting a final exposure based upon info gained via the histogram. In my work leading photo tours. i find that most photographers, including those with top of the line equipment, have very little understanding of how to interpret a histogram and therefore continue using the lightmeter techniques once advocated by folks like Ansel Adams and Minot White. Big mistake!  reply quote 1 year agoBjorn Petersen You’re correct, Winston, that light meters may be less essential than they were in the past, however I would argue it’s not a mistake to say they are still an important tool that many still find useful (myself included). Sure, with digital you can spend time looking at a histogram and making several test exposures to dial in your exposure setting, however, that process can take up avaluable time and it isn’t training you on how to read the scene without relying on making test exposures to interpret lighting ratios or exposure values. Working with a light meter can yield fine results in less time, and it trains you to pay more attention the exact lighting ratios of a scene. Even better than either method, though, is to combine them. Also, they needed to be included in this article since it is not solely focusing on digital cameras- with film cameras, especially large format cameras, a light meter is still a very valuable piece of equipment. reply quote