Framed Landscape Photography

Framed Landscape Photography

Lake District Landscape Photography Prints for CollectionWelcome to my collection of Lake District Landscape Photography, all my Lake District Photographs are available for purchase as gallery quality framed prints or stretched canvases to enjoy on your walls at home.See my Lake District Landscape Photography in the Glenridding GalleryGlenridding Gallery, Glenridding, CA11 0PA If you need any assistance please don’t hesitate to call me on Tel: 07971 825 918Customer Feedback”Our friends loved the print, it was the perfect wedding gift. Thanks again for all your help and the personal service you gave, I must say it was more like dealing with a friend rather than a business!” “Thank you for the prompt service you have given to my order. Your photographs are amazing and I spent a good hour looking through your pictures. We will certainly recommend you to our family and friends if they are looking for a photograph of the Lake District. Thanks again for your prompt service.”Please see my Public Google Reviews from buyers here.

Framed Landscape Photography

Welcome to AustralianLight – Landscape Photography AustralianLight is the collective effort of Australian landscape photographers Russell Stewart and Bernie Zajac. Russell and Bernie have worked tirelessly compiling this collection of exceptional and unique fine art landscape photographs of Australia, all now available via our easy and secure online shopping experience. Whether you are looking for a unique acrylic-mounted print to fill that small space, or to brighten up that entire room with an unforgettable framed panoramic print, our gallery is sure to have an image that will meet your need. Remember, all our prints are all individually produced to the highest possible standards and inspected by hand before leaving for you, so you’re guaranteed to have the highest quality product available! Please enjoy our gallery and we welcome your stay.

Framed Landscape Photography

G Dan Mitchell August 11, 2009 04:20 am I prefer to think of these (and others) as “Four Observations About Composition in Landscape Photography.” They are important and valid and awareness of them is critical. However, I feel like it is time to let go of the word “rules” when discussing these and other issues related to composition. Take care, Dan
Framed Landscape Photography

Framed Landscape Photography

Fuzzypiggy July 25, 2011 09:56 pm One “rule” I follow a lot of the time, “A landscape is not a landscape without an introduction.”! Which means foreground, if you have nothing to catch the viewers eye at the edge and throw it into the scene, you have nothing worth showing. Something must grab the viewer’s eye and introduce it to the scene before it goes in.

Framed Landscape Photography

One “rule” I follow a lot of the time, “A landscape is not a landscape without an introduction.”! Which means foreground, if you have nothing to catch the viewers eye at the edge and throw it into the scene, you have nothing worth showing. Something must grab the viewer’s eye and introduce it to the scene before it goes in.

Framed Landscape Photography

Framing is about using objects in the foreground to frame a point of interest in the background but it’s also about accentuating the landscape. Foliage is your friend! Positioning trees, plants, or other vertical features lets the landscape help you frame the shot.

Framed Landscape Photography

Shirley April 3, 2011 07:48 pm I am just starting out in photography and find the rules of composition most helpful among others. As most of the photgraphs we take as regular people are mostly from our tours/travels, landscapes are always part of our shoots. Even as a beginner with no professional experiences, these rules always makes photos more balanced and ‘thought through’.

Framed Landscape Photography

Todd Eddy August 11, 2009 01:07 am Interestingly enough after a family reunion yesterday I went to a park to take pictures. I was mainly trying infrared photography. Unfortunately I forgot to focus and ruined all the photos. I don’t know where my focus was but it wasn’t anywhere near where it should be where I could pass it off as adding a “dreamy” look to the pictures, it was just off. Anyway I took some regular pictures too and without even reading this article I followed some things that just “made sense” to me. Only thing here that I knew is the rule of thirds but I still used all the tips mentioned here. One tip on the rule of thirds thing (aside from remembering to break it every so often) is don’t think in just horizontal or vertical, think of it as an actual 3×3 grid where you keep anything of interest out of that middle square. Good example of this is a winding road or stream. Have the road move around the image. Also I’ve heard of using “V”s or triangular patterns in photos to direct attention somewhere. Easy example of this is a stream. It appears wide close to you and then gets narrower the further away it goes.

I am just starting out in photography and find the rules of composition most helpful among others. As most of the photgraphs we take as regular people are mostly from our tours/travels, landscapes are always part of our shoots. Even as a beginner with no professional experiences, these rules always makes photos more balanced and ‘thought through’.
Framed Landscape Photography

The vanishing point in any picture is the point at which two parallel lines appear to converge. Medieval painters used vanishing points to simulate three dimensions, making objects smaller and smaller in relation to it. In photography, framing the shot to create a vanishing point adds drama and draws the eye into the shot.

Rex March 5, 2013 08:16 am Another guideline or thought for landscape composition is paying extra attention to the edges of a photo. Often there may be a distracting branch, brush, some man-made clutter, or some other unsightly object on the very edge of your photo. Paying extra attention to those edges and corners will further solidify the strength of the overall composition. It may also lesson the amount of potential ‘Photoshopping’ that might need to be done.

Neil July 29, 2011 04:37 am I attended a workshop with Joe Cornish, the world renowned landscape photographer. He told me that he did not care too much for the rule of thirds. He said it is too restrictive. In his view what counts is that the image must have energy and balance.

Chandrashekhar Bapat November 11, 2009 12:16 pm Dear Darren, Your article is great no doubt. The rules are made for the begineers. But for the photographer who is looking further beyond, he is not satisfied with these rules. A View vpoint, perspective, arrangements of the subjects, colour and brightness of subjects, principal subject and many other factors affect the scene and I think they are much more important than the traditional rules of composition. I would not say that the rules of composition are not useful. But by sticking to the rules, approach may become mechanical. I think to show the depth and vastness in a landscape is also very important. You are kindly requested to put on some light on all these factors. Chandrashekhar Bapat

Another guideline or thought for landscape composition is paying extra attention to the edges of a photo. Often there may be a distracting branch, brush, some man-made clutter, or some other unsightly object on the very edge of your photo. Paying extra attention to those edges and corners will further solidify the strength of the overall composition. It may also lesson the amount of potential ‘Photoshopping’ that might need to be done.

Another guideline or thought for landscape composition is paying extra attention to the edges of a photo. Often there may be a distracting branch, brush, some man-made clutter, or some other unsightly object on the very edge of your photo. Paying extra attention to those edges and corners will further solidify the strength of the overall composition. It may also lesson the amount of potential ‘Photoshopping’ that might need to be done.

Dear Darren, Your article is great no doubt. The rules are made for the begineers. But for the photographer who is looking further beyond, he is not satisfied with these rules. A View vpoint, perspective, arrangements of the subjects, colour and brightness of subjects, principal subject and many other factors affect the scene and I think they are much more important than the traditional rules of composition. I would not say that the rules of composition are not useful. But by sticking to the rules, approach may become mechanical. I think to show the depth and vastness in a landscape is also very important. You are kindly requested to put on some light on all these factors. Chandrashekhar Bapat

Great reminder of rules for the landscape shots. One thing to try is also merging a few of these techniques toghether. In my shot , i wanted to take a shot then looked around mooved 15 feet to the left and saw my shot before i took it. In it you will find a combination of diagonal lines, converging lines Framing, 1/3. Here it is

Photographers of all stripes use the rule of thirds to guide their compositions. The rule basically trashes the idea of framing your subject dead center. If you imagine dividing your image into thirds, vertically and horizontally, the most appealing images have focal points where two of these lines intersect. That’s why many DSLR cameras show the grid in the viewfinder. When composing landscape shots, one of my first considerations is where the horizon line is. If the most interesting part of the shot is the land, I’ll compose my shot so that two thirds of the shot is land, and one third is sky. For shots in which the most dramatic part of the shot is the sky, then I want two thirds sky and one third land. If you missed your chance taking the picture, PicMonkey’s crop tool will guide you.