Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography

Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography

3 weeks agoSuzanne Hudson Hello. Wondered if you could help me- I’ve been wanting to buy a new camera for so long now but find it all quite confusing and after 1 bad buy I want to make sure I get the right one to suit my needs this time. I want a camera primarily for wildlife. I suffer with my health so I’m quite stationery – but have bird feeders etc set up where I can take good pics. Lots of trees nearby etc and badgers that visit. I can use a tripod if it’s a bit heavy – come to the conclusion I’m going to need to do that rather than settling for a light one that doesn’t take good enough photos. I have been looking at things like Nikon P900 bridge, Canon 100d, Nikon 1 V3 (suggested by people on Facebook) or a CSC with a good lens. Would all of those be a step up from my current Lumix FZ38 ? As I’m wanting to go a step better. Any other suggestions?  reply quote 2 weeks agoChloe Lofthouse I have the Nikon P900 bridge and I cannot recommend it highly enough. I’ve captured some amazing shots with it and I love it so much. However, I am looking to go a step better with something more advanced!  reply quote 2 weeks agoManzell L If you are interested in a DSLR camera for sports photography needs, the Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera with 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 STM Lens, B&H # CAE7D218135, would be a good option for your needs, though you would need a longer telephoto zoom lens for sports needs, such as the Tamron SP 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD Telephoto Zoom Lens for Canon, B&H # TA70300C.  If you are looking for a smaller camera with interchangeable lenses, the Sony Alpha a6300 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 16-50mm and 55-210mm Lenses Kit, B&H # SOA6300BK55K, would be a great two-lens kit, while the Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 16-50mm and 55-210mm Lenses (Black), B&H # SOILCE6000YB, would be a slightly more economical option that would also work for your needs. All of the above cameras would have fast burst speeds for sports photography needs and would have large sensors with great image quality. The Nikon Coolpix P900 Digital Camera you own is a popular point-and-shoot camera for sports needs.  While the above cameras would have much better image quality, the main benefit of the P900 is its ridiculously long zoom range.  As cameras with smaller sensors can have lenses with insanely long zoom ranges, the P900 is one of the superzoom point-and-shoot cameras with a long zoom.  Unfortuantely, there are no comparable lenses amongst DSLR cameras or mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lenses due to the massive size (and cost) that would be required for the larger sensor.  However, in any case, the above cameras would be good options for a step up to an advanced camera for sports photography needs. reply quote
best digital camera for nature photography 1

Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography

2 weeks agoChloe Lofthouse I have the Nikon P900 bridge and I cannot recommend it highly enough. I’ve captured some amazing shots with it and I love it so much. However, I am looking to go a step better with something more advanced!  reply quote 2 weeks agoManzell L If you are interested in a DSLR camera for sports photography needs, the Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera with 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 STM Lens, B&H # CAE7D218135, would be a good option for your needs, though you would need a longer telephoto zoom lens for sports needs, such as the Tamron SP 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD Telephoto Zoom Lens for Canon, B&H # TA70300C.  If you are looking for a smaller camera with interchangeable lenses, the Sony Alpha a6300 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 16-50mm and 55-210mm Lenses Kit, B&H # SOA6300BK55K, would be a great two-lens kit, while the Sony Alpha a6000 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 16-50mm and 55-210mm Lenses (Black), B&H # SOILCE6000YB, would be a slightly more economical option that would also work for your needs. All of the above cameras would have fast burst speeds for sports photography needs and would have large sensors with great image quality. The Nikon Coolpix P900 Digital Camera you own is a popular point-and-shoot camera for sports needs.  While the above cameras would have much better image quality, the main benefit of the P900 is its ridiculously long zoom range.  As cameras with smaller sensors can have lenses with insanely long zoom ranges, the P900 is one of the superzoom point-and-shoot cameras with a long zoom.  Unfortuantely, there are no comparable lenses amongst DSLR cameras or mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lenses due to the massive size (and cost) that would be required for the larger sensor.  However, in any case, the above cameras would be good options for a step up to an advanced camera for sports photography needs. reply quote
best digital camera for nature photography 2

Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography

November 29, 2014 Jeff Harmon Yes, Sony cameras are looking REALLY appealing. The price is right too, with the A7II expected at about $1,800 for a full frame camera. A Sony could make for a great option for a first camera – if the beginner can find some help. I also agree that Sony has the gas pedal all the way down while Canon and Nikon seem to be oblivious. Hopefully it came through in the article that I don’t think a beginner can really can’t make a “bad” choice on a first camera. As one of the comments said in Facebook about this post, just get something and start shooting. Get on the path toward understanding the basics of photography. All that said, I do think there is an advantage for a learning shooter in getting the same manufacturer camera as their mentor so that they can follow them precisely along the way with the buttons and menus. The Sony menus, buttons, and EVF may very well be easier and make things better for a beginner. But how helpful is that going to be when they are trying to follow a YouTube video of a Canon camera? When I first started shooting, even though I found free help where the camera was identical, I was having a hard time following. It is really pretty technical to do digital photography, and it may be a little hard for you who have done it for a long time to remember that. Took me the better part of 6 months as a hobbyist photographer who had never taken any classes on the topic to even understand what was being said in podcasts and other instruction videos (free and paid). There is “lingo” that is used by photographers that is difficult for those trying to get into the club to understand. Even worse, I have seen my fair share of photographers not be willing to share the secret handshake to get into the club, as if we beginners have a certain amount of time to pay before getting in. My hope with this article (and series of articles for beginners) is to offer the advice I wish I had been given what I was starting to help make sense of what at first feels like drinking from a fire hydrant. I think this has a lot more to do with people giving up as they get started in photography, than which manufacturer they went with on their first camera. I simply think that a budding photographer is better off matching their camera with someone who will help them drink from that hydrant, and right now (may change in coming years) that is a lot more likely to be Canon or Nikon. But if that mentor shoots Sony, all the better to get started on a system that is thinking more about the future than there is evidence for Canon or Nikon.
best digital camera for nature photography 3

Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography

2 months agoJames Whitehill I will be graduating college soon and losing access to the Nikon D200 have I have been using for the past few years. I am a cyclist and skier so that makes up the majority of my shooting. I would like a body that can shoot video and photo so I have been looking into the Sony a7s ii, the Nikon D500 and the D810. I like nikons in general but after using a friends sony I found it worth looking into. Any thoughts or suggestions as to which would be best or any other cameras that would suit my needs? reply quote 2 months agoManzell L All three of the cameras you list are good cameras, though all three have different designs and would be good for different usage needs.  Both the Nikon D810 DSLR camera and the Sony Alpha a7S II Mirrorless Digital Camera are full-frame cameras, while the Nikon D500 uses the smaller 1.5x APS-C cropped sensor.  The Nikon D810 has the highest resolution of the three cameras, while the Sony a7S II has the lowest resolution, but the best low-light performance and best performance with less noise when using higher ISO settings, which would be beneficial if you are shooting sports in low lighting and need a higher ISO to freeze action.   The Nikon D500 and Sony Alpha a7S II both have tilting LCD screens to assist in shooting at high/low angles for more creative framing, while the LCD screen on the D810 is fixed.  Both the Nikon D500 and the Sony a7S II shoot 4K UHD video, while the Nikon D810 DSLR camera shoots 1080p HD video.  Both Nikon cameras have almost 3x the battery life per charge compared to the Sony a7S II, as the Nikon cameras may shoot approximately 1200 images per charge, versus 370 images per charge with the Sony camera, so you may need more backup batteries when using the Sony battery.  Both the Nikon D500 and the Sony a7S II have built-in Wi-Fi capabilities for transferring images, while wireless file transfer is optional on the Nikon D810 with the purchase of their WT-5A adapter.  The Nikon D500 and Nikon D810 DSLR cameras have dual memory card slots so you may use two cards at once.  The Nikon D500 uses both SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards as well as the new XQD memory card.  The Nikon D810 DSLR camera uses both SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards as well as CompactFlash memory cards.  Both the Nikon D810 and the Sony Alpha a7S II have a burst rate of 5 frames per second, while the Nikon D500 DSLR camera has a 10 frames per second burst rate.  Nikon does have a larger lens library for use on their F-mount, though Sony is adding more lenses to their lineup, and with the use of lens adapters, there are multiple options that would expand the lens choices (and in the case of some Sony/Minolta A-mount lens adapters and Canon EF-mount lens adapters, there are some adapters that will  even retain autofocus and auto exposure capabilities). All that being said, all are good options.  In terms of image quality, the Nikon D810 would have the highest resolution, best color depth, and best dynamic range of the three cameras.  As such, if you simply needed the best image quality the D810 would work for your needs.  If you often shoot in low lighting and would benefit from a cleaner higher ISO range and built-in image stabilization that would benefit any lens used on the camera, then the Sony a7S II would be recommended.  If you needed the fastest autofocus and fastest burst rate, and do not mind the smaller sensor while benefiting from its crop factor to make your subjects appear closer to you, then the Nikon D500 would be recommended.  While there is no one “right” answer, and your planned usage and budget would be a determining factor in your ultimate purchase, I hope the above shows some of the differences in the cameras you listed and why one may perform better for your needs compared to another option. reply quote 1 month agojames wow thanks so much for the awesome in depth response! reply quote

Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography

Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography
Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography
Best Digital Camera For Nature Photography